Here are Five Lessons Your College-Bound Kids Can Learn in the Next 15 Days That Will Guarantee Them a College Acceptance Letter (#2)

#2: Now That You've Picked a Prompt & Created Your Claim, Now It's Time To PROVE Your Claim!

A great personal statement essay is made up of one or more “little stories” that prove your claim. Most often, your claim is something like:

“This experience illustrates that I have 
intellect, perseverance, and resilience even 
in the face of disappointment or failure."

Ultimately, the claim needs to prove that you would be a good fit for the college or university to which you are applying.

Often times, students have trouble figuring out how much of the story to tell. The story or example cannot be the only thing in the personal statement essay. You also need a good introduction and a conclusion, and some people include more than one story.


FIRST, YOU NEED TO DECIDE WHAT ARE THE KEY LESSONS THE STORY IMPARTS?

Let's imagine that your story is about finding out that your debate team had been practicing for the wrong set of questions the whole time, which caused you to stay up all night before the competition reworking your arguments. In the end you did not win the debate, but you made a respectable showing, and you learned some things.

So the first question is, what did this experience teach you?

Answer: I learned that when you pull together with a team on a clear goal you can achieve almost anything.


OK. NOW THAT YOU HAVE AN IDEA OF WHAT THE STORY TEACHES, YOU CAN SKETCH OUT THE EVENTS THAT LED TO THE LEARNING OF THE LESSON.

I suggest three events representing a beginninga middle, and an end of the story.

Here's what this student’s debate story sketch might look like.

·      Beginning: Our team received the document with the issues to study for the upcoming debate. We spent a lot of time preparing intricate plans to do the best we could, and we were hoping to win.

·      Middle: About 48 hours before the debate we received an email from the organization referencing the issues and they were totally different than the ones we’d been practicing. We realized we had read the document wrong.

·      End: We got together and pulled an “all nighter,” reworking our opening statements and arguments, and we completed it just as the sun was coming up.


THE NEXT STEP WOULD BE TO ADD “FEELING WORDS” TO EACH OF THE PARTS OF THE STORY. FOR INSTANCE, HOW DID THE WRITER FEEL AFTER THE BEGINNING EVENTS?

Answer: She probably felt confident, excited, prepared, and hopeful.


THEN YOU SHOULD BRAINSTORM SOME SENSORY WORDS, AND FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE LIKE A SIMILES AND METAPHORS.

Sensory words are words that speak to the five senses: hearing, taste, touch, sight, and smell.  For instance, “The musty library and dusty stacks held all the research we needed.”

Or maybe the debate document fresh from the printer “felt warm and inviting on their hands.”

Similes and metaphors are comparisons of two unlike things. For instance, “the disappointment stung like a bee.”

Or maybe upon the receiving the email with the issues to study for the upcoming debate, “they felt like a lottery winners.” 


YOU SHOULD DO THIS FOR EACH OF THE THREE PARTS OF YOUR STORY. THE POINT HERE IS TO DEVELOP A BANK OF MATERIAL TO CHOOSE FROM BEFORE YOU ASSEMBLE THE PERSONAL STATEMENT ESSAY.

This is pre-writing and brainstorming, and it is like making clay pottery. It is much easier to whittle down a lot of clay into a small piece like an ashtray, than to take a small amount of clay and try to turn it into a large item like a tall vase.


Here is what just one client has to say about the Get The Acceptance Letter System:

 

Come back each week for more valuable lessons on how to write an extraordinary college entrance essay.

Bonus: Download a FREE video tutorial HERE!

Here are Five Lessons Your College-Bound Kids Can Learn in the Next 15 Days That Will Guarantee Them a College Acceptance Letter (#1)

#1: Pick a Prompt and Figure Out How to Respond To It

Note: If you haven't created an account on the COMMON APPLICATION, you should do so immediately.  


The common application is where you can apply to over 700 colleges in one place for one fee.  And even the fee can be waived.


FIRST, change the prompt from a question to a statement and insert personal pronouns so that the statement sounds as if you are saying it right now:
HERE’S THE ORIGINAL:
"Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story."
HERE IS HOW IT SOUNDS MORE PERSONALIZED:
I have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful I believe my application would be incomplete without it. Here is my story:

This is a good start but now you have to decide which of the items (background, interest, identity, or talent) if omitted would make your application incomplete.

Since I don't know you, I will make up an “example student” to show you how this prompt might become further refined and even segue into a thesis for the resulting essay.

Now remember the personalized version of the prompt reads like this so far: “I have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful I believe my application would be incomplete without it. Here is my story:”

For the purposes of this example, we’re going to say that that an INTEREST that is MEANINGFUL to the “example student” is WRITING. With that in mind, let’s further refine the PROMPT to reflect that INTEREST.

SO FAR WE HAVE: “I have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful I believe my application would be incomplete without it. Here is my story:”

HERE IS HOW IT SOUNDS FURTHER REFINED: “My application would be incomplete without mentioning my writing. Here is my story:”

Okay! Our “example student” now has a solid direction for responding to the prompt. They know their essay will focus on their interest and talent for writing.


Come back each week to get the continuation of this lesson on how to write an extraordinary college entrance essay.

Scholarship: DUE No later than midnight on April 18, 2017

SKECHERS Foundation is proud to announce the SKECHERS Foundation Scholarship Program. SKECHERS Foundation Scholarships are available to any students who meet the eligibility requirements.

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One requirement is "a statement of career and educational goals and objectives, unusual personal or family circumstances." APPLY HERE.

Click here to schedule a FREE 30 minute consultation so we can devise a schedule for me to work with your college-bound kid to apply for this scholarship and the others on my SUPER SCHOLARSHIP LIST.

 

 

Scholarship: DUE 8:00 PM ET on March 28, 2017

DEBT FREE DEGREE ALERT!

The 2017 Operation Prevention Video Challenge

Check Out the Prizes

  • 1st Place: $10,000

  • 2nd Place: $5,000

  • 3rd Place: $1,000

People's Choice prize: A trip to Quantico, VA for an exclusive tour of DEA training.


You should schedule a FREE 30 MINUTE Call with me to plan out how to get your screenager a debt free degree.  Or maybe, you need to start at the “how in the heck do we even apply for college” part of this process.  I offer “Done For You” services and RESULTS.

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Here are just a few tips for doing well on this application:

Tip 1: Participant(s) must be registered and the Participant(s)’ video must be uploaded between 5:00 PM ET on December 6, 2016 and 8:00 PM ET on March 28, 2017.

Tip 2: Create an original 30 to 60 second public service announcement video which sends a message about prescription opioid misuse and heroin use that would make students’ peers think twice about using heroin or misusing prescription opioids

Tip 3: To upload your Entry Video, you must first create a registered user account at www.youtube.com

Apply HERE


Are you a busy parent of a college bound kid? Did you know the key to a #debtfreedegree is an extraordinary college admissions essay?

CLICK HERE TO SCHEDULE A FREE 30 MINUTE CALL & LET'S DESIGN A PATH TO SUCCESS FOR YOUR CHILD!